Diversity in Steampunk – Exclusion from Inclusion

Update: In documenting the journey of merging East and West more equally within Steampunk, the below post will remain visible. It needs to be clarified however that as far as the interviewees are concerned, the situation has been resolved to satisfaction and all Steampunk ties are intact.

The beauty of Steampunk, among other things, is that everyone is dedicated to civilised communication; the frankness and support of those involved have been a perfect example of this.

Original Post (04/09/2014)

Steampunk India’s letter to the Independent on Sunday regarding the New Review Steampunk feature from the 31st of August:

The great irony. To be asked by the Independent on Sunday for an interview on MultiCulturalism in Steampunk at the Steampunk Summer Fete Event in Greenwich.
And a white lady pretty much pushed in and said to the journalist ‘do you want to interview us both together?’ (I must say that she was also set to be interviewed on her own subject within Steampunk).

To see the article finally come out, and I am not in it all (not whining here, editorial decisions have to be made), and to see a huge picture of the white lady, with *her* quote about multiculturalism and inclusion in Steampunk, but not my perspective, is a massive dose of ‘Same Old, Same Old.’

I am aware this sounds like sour grapes, but that is really not what I’m saying.

It’s not just the fashion that has been transported through time; to hear a white person make my point must feel how a black performer felt watching The Black and White Minstrels.

I’m sure its all a massive coincidence. Culture is built from an avalanche of coincidences.

Best Regards,
Suna Dasi
Steampunk India

P.S. The event organiser, Yomi Ayeni, was also wholly absent from the article: strange in itself. Total coincidence he was the only black person.

Below: Writer Suna Dasi at the Greenwich Steampunk Summer Fete, acting the part of Tinku Ranbir as portrayed in The Clockwork Watch. Artwork by Jennie Gyllblad. Photo by Ziggy Gaji. (www.clockworkwatch.com)

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2 Comments

Filed under Acting, Articles by Others, Diversity, Events, Hidden Exclusion, Media, MultiCulturalism in Steampunk, Steampunk, Writing

2 responses to “Diversity in Steampunk – Exclusion from Inclusion

  1. Suna… sorry to read this… I know we talked about it before, but it continues to amaze me… when they set out to address a certain subject, only to pick the strangest of spokespeople to make a point.. that isn’t the point… or rather the odd opposite in point…

    I also really appreciate HOW you make your point. I can feel the heart you put into your words.. BRAVA, dear one… BRAVA

  2. Bill East

    There were a number of comments on the largest national steampunk forum reflecting the views of the letter writer. Steampunk is truly the most diverse and accepting subculture that exists and the article, whilst well written on the whole, should have illustrated this.

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